abator






verb (used with object), a·bat·ed, a·bat·ing.

  1. to reduce in amount, degree, intensity, etc.; lessen; diminish: to abate a tax; to abate one’s enthusiasm.
  2. Law.
    1. to put an end to or suppress (a nuisance).
    2. to suspend or extinguish (an action).
    3. to annul (a writ).
  3. to deduct or subtract: to abate part of the cost.
  4. to omit: to abate all mention of names.
  5. to remove, as in stone carving, or hammer down, as in metalwork, (a portion of a surface) in order to produce a figure or pattern in low relief.

verb (used without object), a·bat·ed, a·bat·ing.

  1. to diminish in intensity, violence, amount, etc.: The storm has abated. The pain in his shoulder finally abated.
  2. Law. to end; become null and void.

noun

  1. law a person who effects an abatement

verb

  1. to make or become less in amount, intensity, degree, etcthe storm has abated
  2. (tr) law
    1. to remove, suppress, or terminate (a nuisance)
    2. to suspend or extinguish (a claim or action)
    3. to annul (a writ)
  3. (intr) law (of a writ, legal action, etc) to become null and void
  4. (tr) to subtract or deduct, as part of a price
v.

“put an end to” (c.1300); “to grow less, diminish in power or influence” (early 14c.), from Old French abattre “beat down, cast down,” from Vulgar Latin *abbatere, from Latin ad “to” (see ad-) + battuere “to beat” (see batter (v.)). Secondary sense of “to fell, slaughter” is in abatis and abattoir. Related: Abated; abating.

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