antibodies








noun, plural an·ti·bod·ies.

  1. any of numerous Y-shaped protein molecules produced by B cells as a primary immune defense, each molecule and its clones having a unique binding site that can combine with the complementary site of a foreign antigen, as on a virus or bacterium, thereby disabling the antigen and signaling other immune defenses. Abbreviation: Ab
  2. antibodies of a particular type collectively.

noun plural -bodies

  1. any of various proteins produced in the blood in response to the presence of an antigen. By becoming attached to antigens on infectious organisms antibodies can render them harmless or cause them to be destroyedSee also immunoglobulin
n.

“substance developed in blood as an antitoxin,” 1901, a hybrid formed from anti- “against” + body. Probably a translation of German Antikörper, condensed from a phrase such as anti-toxisches Körper “anti-toxic body.”

n.

  1. A protein substance produced in the blood or tissues in response to a specific antigen, such as a bacterium or a toxin, that destroys or weakens bacteria and neutralizes organic poisons, thus forming the basis of immunity.
  2. An immunoglobulin present in the blood serum or body fluids as a result of antigenic stimulus and interacting only with the antigen that induced it or with an antigen closely related to it.

  1. Any of numerous proteins produced by B lymphocytes in response to the presence of specific foreign antigens, including microorganisms and toxins. Antibodies consist of two pairs of polypeptide chains, called heavy chains and light chains, that are arranged in a Y-shape. The two tips of the Y are the regions that bind to antigens and deactivate them. Also called immunoglobulin

Proteins in the blood that are produced by the body in response to specific antigens (such as bacteria). (See immune system.)

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