appeasement








verb (used with object), ap·peased, ap·peas·ing.

  1. to bring to a state of peace, quiet, ease, calm, or contentment; pacify; soothe: to appease an angry king.
  2. to satisfy, allay, or relieve; assuage: The fruit appeased his hunger.
  3. to yield or concede to the belligerent demands of (a nation, group, person, etc.) in a conciliatory effort, sometimes at the expense of justice or other principles.

noun

  1. the policy of acceding to the demands of a potentially hostile nation in the hope of maintaining peace
  2. the act of appeasing

verb (tr)

  1. to calm, pacify, or soothe, esp by acceding to the demands of
  2. to satisfy or quell (an appetite or thirst, etc)
n.

mid-15c., “pacification,” from Middle French apeisement, Old French apaisement “appeasement, calming,” noun of action from apaisier (see appease). First recorded 1919 in international political sense; not pejorative until failure of Chamberlain’s policy toward Germany in 1939 (Methods of appeasement was Chamberlain’s description of his policy).

v.

c.1300 “to reconcile,” from Anglo-French apeser, Old French apaisier “to pacify, make peace, appease, be reconciled, placate” (12c.), from the phrase a paisier “bring to peace,” from a “to” (see ad-) + pais, from Latin pacem (nominative pax) “peace” (see peace). Related: Appeased; appeasing.

A political policy of conceding to aggression by a warlike nation.

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