ataman









ataman


ataman [at-uh-muh n] ExamplesWord Origin noun, plural at·a·mans.

  1. the elected chief of a Cossack village or military force.

Origin of ataman 1825–35; Russian atamán, Old Russian vatamanŭ, probably alteration of a Turkic word with the personal suffix -man; identity of initial element disputed Examples from the Web for ataman Contemporary Examples of ataman

  • The decision maker turned out to be a gray-haired Cossack ataman, or commander, in a traditional sheepskin hat.

    Held at Gunpoint by Ukraine Rebels

    Anna Nemtsova

    May 31, 2014

  • Historical Examples of ataman

  • The common saying, “Bear patiently, Cossack; you will one day be Ataman!”

    Russia

    Donald Mackenzie Wallace

  • In a moment we found ourselves surrounded by them, while a path in front was stopped by the Ataman.

    Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Vol. 53, No. 331, May, 1843

    Various

  • If I had not entered into conversation with the Ataman, we should have been riddled with balls at the first movement.

    Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, Vol. 53, No. 331, May, 1843

    Various

  • The younger is the Ataman himself; the elder is his father, an old soldier of the first campaigns of Nicholas.

    The Galaxy

    Various

  • But Sinbad, being a man of humane temper, thinks that the sport has gone far enough, and appeals to the Ataman to stop it.

    The Galaxy

    Various

  • British Dictionary definitions for ataman ataman noun plural -mans

    1. an elected leader of the Cossacks; hetman

    Word Origin for ataman from Russian, from Polish hetman, from German Hauptmann (literally: head man)

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