barque









barque


noun

  1. bark3.

noun

  1. Nautical. a sailing vessel having three or more masts, square-rigged on all but the aftermost mast, which is fore-and-aft-rigged.
  2. Literary. a boat or sailing vessel.

noun

  1. a sailing ship of three or more masts having the foremasts rigged square and the aftermast rigged fore-and-aft
  2. poetic any boat, esp a small sailing vessel

noun

  1. the loud abrupt usually harsh or gruff cry of a dog or any of certain other animals
  2. a similar sound, such as one made by a person, gun, etc
  3. his bark is worse than his bite he is bad-tempered but harmless

verb

  1. (intr) (of a dog or any of certain other animals) to make its typical loud abrupt cry
  2. (intr) (of a person, gun, etc) to make a similar loud harsh sound
  3. to say or shout in a brusque, peremptory, or angry tonehe barked an order
  4. US informal to advertise (a show, merchandise, etc) by loudly addressing passers-by
  5. bark up the wrong tree informal to misdirect one’s attention, efforts, etc; be mistaken

noun

  1. a protective layer of dead corky cells on the outside of the stems of woody plants
  2. any of several varieties of this substance that can be used in tanning, dyeing, or in medicine
  3. an informal name for cinchona

verb (tr)

  1. to scrape or rub off skin, as in an injury
  2. to remove the bark or a circle of bark from (a tree or log)
  3. to cover or enclose with bark
  4. to tan (leather), principally by the tannins in barks

noun

  1. a variant spelling (esp US) of barque
n.

variant of bark (n.2).

n.3

dog sound, Old English beorc, from bark (v.). Paired and compared with bite (n.) since at least 1660s; the proverb is older: “Timid dogs bark worse than they bite” was in Latin (Canis timidus vehementius latrat quam mordet, Quintius Curtius).

n.1

“tree skin,” c.1300, from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse borkr “bark,” from Proto-Germanic *barkuz, which probably is related to birch and Low German borke. The native word was rind.

n.2

“any small ship,” early 15c., from Middle French barque (15c.), from Late Latin barca (c.400 C.E.), probably cognate with Vulgar Latin *barica (see barge). More precise sense of “three-masted ship” (17c.) often is spelled barque to distinguish it.

v.

in reference to a dog sound, Old English beorcan “to bark,” from Proto-Germanic *berkanan (cf. Old Norse berkja “to bark”), of echoic origin. Related: Barked; barking. To bark up the wrong tree is U.S. colloquial, first attested 1832, from notion of hounds following the wrong scent.

  1. The protective outer covering of the trunk, branches, and roots of trees and other woody plants. Bark includes all tissues outside the vascular cambium. In older trees, bark is usually divided into inner bark, consisting of living phloem, and outer bark, consisting of the periderm (the phelloderm, cork cambium, and cork) and all the tissues outside it. The outer bark is mainly dead tissue that protects the tree from heat, cold, insects, and other dangers. The appearance of bark varies according to the manner in which the periderm forms, as in broken layers or smoother rings. Bark also has lenticels, porous corky areas that allow for the exchange of water vapor and gases with the interior living tissues.

In addition to the idioms beginning with bark

  • bark is worse than his bite
  • bark up the wrong tree

also see:

  • talk one’s arm off (the bark off a tree)

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