basinlike









basinlike


noun

  1. a circular container with a greater width than depth, becoming smaller toward the bottom, used chiefly to hold water or other liquid, especially for washing.
  2. any container of similar shape, as the pan of a balance.
  3. the quantity held by such a container: We need another basin of water to dilute the mixture.
  4. a natural or artificial hollow place containing water.
  5. a partially enclosed, sheltered area along a shore, often partly man-made or dredged to a greater depth, where boats may be moored: a yacht basin.
  6. Geology. an area in which the strata dip from the margins toward a common center.
  7. Physical Geography.
    1. a hollow or depression in the earth’s surface, wholly or partly surrounded by higher land: river basin.
    2. drainage basin.
  8. Botany. the depression in an apple, pear, or other pome at the end opposite the stem.

noun

  1. a round container open and wide at the top with sides sloping inwards towards the bottom or base, esp one in which liquids are mixed or stored
  2. Also called: basinful the amount a basin will hold
  3. a washbasin or sink
  4. any partially enclosed or sheltered area where vessels may be moored or docked
  5. the catchment area of a particular river and its tributaries or of a lake or sea
  6. a depression in the earth’s surface
  7. geology a part of the earth’s surface consisting of rock strata that slope down to a common centre
n.

“large shallow vessel or dish,” c.1200, from Old French bacin (11c., Modern French bassin), from Vulgar Latin *baccinum, from *bacca “water vessel,” perhaps originally Gaulish. Meaning “large-scale artificial water-holding landscape feature” is from 1712. Geological sense of “tract of country drained by one river or draining into one sea” is from 1830.

  1. A region drained by a river and its tributaries.
  2. A low-lying area on the Earth’s surface in which thick layers of sediment have accumulated. Some basins are bowl-shaped while others are elongate. Basins form through tectonic processes, especially in fault-bordered intermontane areas or in areas where the Earth’s crust has warped downwards. They are often a source of valuable oil.
  3. An artificially enclosed area of a river or harbor designed so that the water level remains unaffected by tidal changes.

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