Copernicus









Copernicus


noun

  1. Nic·o·la·us [nik-uhleyuh s] /ˌnɪk əˈleɪ əs/, Mikolaj Kopernik, 1473–1543, Polish astronomer who promulgated the now accepted theory that the earth and the other planets move around the sun (the Copernican System).
  2. a crater in the second quadrant of the face of the moon, having an extensive ray system: about 56 miles (90 km) in diameter from crest to crest with walls rising about 12,000 feet (3650 meters) from its floor; having several central mountains the highest being about 2400 feet (730 meters).

noun

  1. Nicolaus (ˌnɪkəˈleɪəs). Polish name Mikolaj Kopernik. 1473–1543, Polish astronomer, whose theory of the solar system (the Copernican system) was published in 1543

noun

  1. a conspicuous crater on the moon, over 4000 metres deep and 90 kilometres in diameter, from which a system of rays emanates

Latinized form of name of Mikolaj Koppernigk (1473-1543), physician and canon of the cathedral of Frauenburg. His great work was “De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium.”

  1. Polish astronomer whose theory that Earth and other planets revolve around the Sun provided the foundation for modern astronomy. His model displaced earlier theories that positioned Earth at the center of the solar system with all objects orbiting it.

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