electrode








noun Electricity.

  1. a conductor, not necessarily metallic, through which a current enters or leaves a nonmetallic medium, as an electrolytic cell, arc generator, vacuum tube, or gaseous discharge tube.

noun

  1. a conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves an electrolyte, an electric arc, or an electronic valve or tube
  2. an element in a semiconducting device that emits, collects, or controls the movement of electrons or holes
n.

1834, coined by English physicist and chemist Michael Faraday (1791-1867) from electro- + Greek hodos “way” (see cede) on same pattern as anode, cathode.

n.

  1. A solid electric conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves an electrolytic cell or other medium.
  2. A collector or emitter of electric charge or of electric-charge carriers, as in a semiconducting device.

  1. A conductor through which an electric current enters or leaves a substance (or a vacuum) whose electrical characteristics are being measured, used, or manipulated. Electrodes can be used to detect electrical activity such as brain waves. Terminal points in electrical components such as transistors, diodes, and batteries are electrodes.

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