fellowshipping








noun

  1. the condition or relation of being a fellow: the fellowship of humankind.
  2. friendly relationship; companionship: the fellowship of father and son.
  3. community of interest, feeling, etc.
  4. communion, as between members of the same church.
  5. friendliness.
  6. an association of persons having similar tastes, interests, etc.
  7. a company, guild, or corporation.
  8. Education.
    1. the body of fellows in a college or university.
    2. the position or emoluments of a fellow of a college or university, or the sum of money he or she receives.
    3. a foundation for the maintenance of a fellow in a college or university.

verb (used with object), fel·low·shipped or fel·low·shiped, fel·low·ship·ping or fel·low·ship·ing.

  1. to admit to fellowship, especially religious fellowship.

verb (used without object), fel·low·shipped or fel·low·shiped, fel·low·ship·ping or fel·low·ship·ing.

  1. to join in fellowship, especially religious fellowship.

noun

  1. the state of sharing mutual interests, experiences, activities, etc
  2. a society of people sharing mutual interests, experiences, activities, etc; club
  3. companionship; friendship
  4. the state or relationship of being a fellow
    1. mutual trust and charitableness between Christians
    2. a Church or religious association
  5. education
    1. a financed research post providing study facilities, privileges, etc, often in return for teaching services
    2. a foundation endowed to support a postgraduate research student
    3. an honorary title carrying certain privileges awarded to a postgraduate student
  6. (often capital) the body of fellows in a college, university, etc
n.

c.1200, feolahschipe “companionship,” from fellow + -ship. In Middle English it was at times a euphemism for “sexual intercourse” (carnal fellowship).

To fellowship with is to hold communion with; to unite with in doctrine and discipline. This barbarism now appears with disgusting frequency in the reports of ecclesiastical conventions, and in the religious newspapers generally. [Bartlett, “Dictionary of Americanisms,” 1848]

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