helmed








noun

  1. Nautical.
    1. a wheel or tiller by which a ship is steered.
    2. the entire steering apparatus of a ship.
    3. the angle with the fore-and-aft line made by a rudder when turned: 15-degree helm.
  2. the place or post of control: A stern taskmaster was at the helm of the company.

verb (used with object)

  1. to steer; direct.

noun

  1. Also heaume. Also called great helm. a medieval helmet, typically formed as a single cylindrical piece with a flat or raised top, completely enclosing the head.
  2. Archaic. a helmet.

verb (used with object)

  1. to furnish or cover with a helmet.

noun

  1. nautical
    1. the wheel, tiller, or entire apparatus by which a vessel is steered
    2. the position of the helm: that is, on the side of the keel opposite from that of the rudder
  2. a position of leadership or control (esp in the phrase at the helm)

verb

  1. (tr) to direct or steer

noun

  1. an archaic or poetic word for helmet

verb

  1. (tr) archaic, or poetic to supply with a helmet
n.2

“a helmet,” c.1200, from Old English helm “protection, covering; crown, helmet,” and perhaps also from cognate Old Norse hjalmr, from Proto-Germanic *helmaz “protective covering,” from PIE *kel- “to cover, to hide” (see cell). Italian elmo, Spanish yelmo are from Germanic.

n.1

“handle of a tiller,” late 13c., from Old English helma “rudder; position of guidance, control,” from Proto-Germanic *halbma- (cf. Old Norse hjalm, Old High German helmo, German Helm “handle”), from PIE *kelp- “to hold, grasp” (see helve).

see at the helm.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

56 queries 1.963