maravedi









maravedi


maravedi [mar-uh-vey-dee] ExamplesWord Origin noun, plural mar·a·ve·dis.

  1. a former gold coin issued by the Moors in Spain.
  2. a former minor copper coin of Spain, discontinued in 1848.

Origin of maravedi 1530–40; Spanish maravedí, from Arabic Murābitīn the Almoravids; see marabout Examples from the Web for maravedi Historical Examples of maravedi

  • I hold my pardon, and care not a maravedi for spy or informer.

    Micah Clarke

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • I have nothing to give you, and if I had a whole world I would not give a maravedi’s worth to you.

    The Firebrand

    S. R. Crockett

  • I would not have given ten maravedi for my head when those children of the devil were pushing us against the wall.

    The White Company

    Arthur Conan Doyle

  • In a comprehensive way it may be said that the history of this word or name, maravedi, sums up the monetary history of Spain.

    The History of Currency, 1252 to 1896

    William Arthur Shaw

  • At the time of its adoption by the Christian powers of Spain, the maravedi (or sueldo de oro) was equal to 1⁄6 onza of gold.

    The History of Currency, 1252 to 1896

    William Arthur Shaw

  • British Dictionary definitions for maravedi maravedi noun plural -dis

    1. any of various Spanish coins of copper or gold

    Word Origin for maravedi C15: from Spanish, from Arabic Murābitīn (plural of murābit marabout), the Moorish dynasty in Córdoba, 1087–1147

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