mardy









mardy


mardy [mahr-dee]British Dialect ExamplesWord Origin adjective, mar·di·er, mar·di·est.

  1. grumpy or moody; sulky: She’s behaving like a typical mardy teenager, refusing to tell us what’s wrong.

noun

  1. a grumpy mood; a sulk: He’s a good old chap, but he sometimes comes home in a mardy after stopping at the pub.

Origin of mardy mard ‘spoiled; spoiled child’ (alteration of marred, past tense of mar) + -y1 Examples from the Web for mardy Historical Examples of mardy

  • Oh, that’s Mardy all over—always thinking of something for us!

    The Little Grey House

    Marion Ames Taggart

  • Mardy, you know it must have cost at least three dollars—both of it.

    The Little Grey House

    Marion Ames Taggart

  • Mayn’t I ask the boys and Frances down to-night to rejoice with us, Mardy?

    The Little Grey House

    Marion Ames Taggart

  • “You needn’t complain if Mardy doesn’t,” said Prue, sharply.

    The Little Grey House

    Marion Ames Taggart

  • “This has done something wonderful for me, Mardy,” she said, slowly.

    The Little Grey House

    Marion Ames Taggart

  • British Dictionary definitions for mardy mardy adjective dialect

    1. (of a child) spoilt
    2. irritable

    Word Origin for mardy from marred, past participle of mar

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