orion







orion


noun, genitive Or·i·o·nis [awr-ee-oh-nis, or-, uhrahyuh-nis] /ˌɔr iˈoʊ nɪs, ˌɒr-, əˈraɪ ə nɪs/ for 2.

  1. Classical Mythology. a giant hunter who pursued the Pleiades, was eventually slain by Artemis, and was then placed in the sky as a constellation.
  2. Astronomy. the Hunter, a constellation lying on the celestial equator between Canis Major and Taurus, containing the bright stars Betelgeuse and Rigel.
  3. Military. a land-based U.S. Navy patrol plane with four turboprop engines, used to detect, track, and destroy enemy submarines and armed with missiles, torpedoes, mines, and depth bombs.

noun

  1. Greek myth a Boeotian giant famed as a great hunter, who figures in several tales

noun Latin genitive Orionis (ˌɔːrɪˈəʊnɪs)

  1. a conspicuous constellation near Canis Major containing two first magnitude stars (Betelgeuse and Rigel) and a distant bright emission nebula (the Orion Nebula) associated with a system of giant molecular clouds and star formation

bright constellation, late 14c., from Greek Oarion, name of a giant in Greek mythology, loved by Aurora, slain by Artemis, of unknown origin, though some speculate on Akkadian Uru-anna “the Light of Heaven.” Another Greek name for the constellation was Kandaon, a title of Ares, god of war, and the star pattern is represented in many cultures as a giant (e.g. Old Irish Caomai “the Armed King,” Old Norse Orwandil, Old Saxon Ebuðrung).

  1. A constellation in the equatorial region of the celestial sphere, near Taurus and Gemini. Orion (the Hunter) contains the bright stars Betelgeuse and Rigel.

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