peep









peep


verb (used without object)

  1. to look through a small opening or from a concealed location.
  2. to look slyly, pryingly, or furtively.
  3. to look curiously or playfully.
  4. to come partially into view; begin to appear: the first crocuses peeping through the snow-covered ground.

verb (used with object)

  1. to show or protrude slightly.

noun

  1. a quick or furtive look or glance.
  2. the first appearance, as of dawn.
  3. an aperture for looking through.

noun

  1. a short, shrill little cry or sound, as of a young bird; cheep; squeak.
  2. any of various small sandpipers.
  3. a slight sound or remark, especially in complaint: I don’t want to hear a peep out of any of you!

verb (used without object)

  1. to utter the short, shrill little cry of a young bird, a mouse, etc.; cheep; squeak.
  2. to speak in a thin, weak voice.

noun

  1. Jeep.

plural noun, singular peep.

  1. one’s friends, family, followers, etc.: I’ll have to ask my peeps about this.
  2. people: Only ten peeps showed up for the hike.

verb (intr)

  1. to look furtively or secretly, as through a small aperture or from a hidden place
  2. to appear partially or brieflythe sun peeped through the clouds

noun

  1. a quick or furtive look
  2. the first appearancethe peep of dawn

verb (intr)

  1. (esp of young birds) to utter shrill small noises
  2. to speak in a thin shrill voice

noun

  1. a peeping sound
  2. US any of various small sandpipers of the genus Calidris (or Erolia) and related genera, such as the pectoral sandpiper

v.1“glance” (especially through a small opening), mid-15c., perhaps alteration of Middle English piken (see peek (v.)). Peeping Tom “a curious prying fellow” [Grose] is from 1796; connection with Lady Godiva story dates only from 1837. v.2“make a short chirp,” c.1400, probably altered from pipen (mid-13c.), ultimately imitative (cf. Latin pipare, French pepier, German piepen, Lithuanian pypti, Czech pipati, Greek pipos). n.11520s, first in sense found in peep of day, from peep (v.1); meaning “a furtive glance” is first recorded 1730. n.2“short chirp,” early 15c., from peep (v.2); meaning “slightest sound or utterance” (usually in a negative context) is attested from 1903. Meaning “young chicken” is from 1680s. The marshmallow peeps confection are said to date from 1950s. abbr.

  1. positive end-expiratory pressure

see hear a peep out of.

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