richard trench









richard trench


noun

  1. Richard Chen·e·vix [shenuh-vee] /ˈʃɛn ə vi/, 1807–86, English clergyman and scholar, born in Ireland.

noun

  1. a deep ditch or furrow
  2. a ditch dug as a fortification, having a parapet of the excavated earth

verb

  1. to make a trench in (a place)
  2. (tr) to fortify with a trench or trenches
  3. to slash or be slashed
  4. (intr; foll by on or upon) to encroach or verge
n.

late 14c., “track cut through a wood,” later “long, narrow ditch” (late 15c.), from Old French trenche “a slice, ditch” (late 13c.), from trenchier “to cut,” possibly from Vulgar Latin *trincare, from Latin truncare “to cut or lop off” (see truncate). Trenches for military protection are first so called c.1500. Trench warfare first attested 1918. Trench-coat first recorded 1916, a type of coat worn by British officers in the trenches.

  1. A long, steep-sided valley on the ocean floor. Trenches form when one tectonic plate slides beneath another plate at a subduction zone. The Marianas Trench, located in the western Pacific east of the Philippines, is the deepest known trench (10,924 m or 35,831 ft) and the deepest area in the ocean.

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