rondo









rondo


rondo [ron-doh, ron-doh] ExamplesWord Origin noun, plural ron·dos. Music.

  1. a work or movement, often the last movement of a sonata, having one principal subject that is stated at least three times in the same key and to which return is made after the introduction of each subordinate theme.

Origin of rondo 1790–1800; Italian French rondeau; see rondel Examples from the Web for rondo Historical Examples of rondo

  • It consists of an air, nine variations and a finale which is in rondo form.

    A Popular History of the Art of Music

    W. S. B. Mathews

  • Only the Adagio and Rondo of his Concerto had a decided success.

    Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician

    Frederick Niecks

  • The Rondo, Op. 73, was not originally written for two pianos.

    Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician

    Frederick Niecks

  • To her Chopin dedicated his first published work, Rondo, op. 1.

    Frederic Chopin, v. 1 (of 2)

    Moritz Karasowski

  • As for the Rondo I do not want any opinion on that at present, for I am not satisfied with it myself.

    Frederic Chopin, v. 1 (of 2)

    Moritz Karasowski

  • British Dictionary definitions for rondo rondo noun plural -dos

    1. a piece of music in which a refrain is repeated between episodes: often constitutes the form of the last movement of a sonata or concerto

    Word Origin for rondo C18: from Italian, from French rondeau Word Origin and History for rondo n.

    1797, “musical composition of one principal theme, which is repeated at least once,” from Italian rondo, from French rondeau, rondel, from Old French rondel “little round” (see rondel).

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