tired









tired


adjective

  1. exhausted, as by exertion; fatigued or sleepy: a tired runner.
  2. weary or bored (usually followed by of): tired of the same food every day.
  3. hackneyed; stale, as a joke, phrase, or sermon.
  4. Informal. impatient or disgusted: You make me tired.

adjective

  1. having a tire or tires.

verb (used with object), tired, tir·ing.

  1. to reduce or exhaust the strength of, as by exertion; make weary; fatigue: The long walk tired him.
  2. to exhaust the interest, patience, etc., of; make weary; bore: Your stories tire me.

verb (used without object), tired, tir·ing.

  1. to have the strength reduced or exhausted, as by labor or exertion; become fatigued; be sleepy.
  2. to have one’s appreciation, interest, patience, etc., exhausted; become or be weary; become bored (usually followed by of): He soon tired of playing billiards.

noun

  1. British Dialect. fatigue.

noun

  1. a ring or band of rubber, either solid or hollow and inflated, or of metal, placed over the rim of a wheel to provide traction, resistance to wear, or other desirable properties.
  2. a metal band attached to the outside of the felloes and forming the tread of a wagon wheel.

verb (used with object), tired, tir·ing.

  1. to furnish with tires.

verb (used with object), tired, tir·ing.

  1. Archaic. to dress (the head or hair), especially with a headdress.
  2. Obsolete. to attire or array.

noun

  1. Archaic. a headdress.
  2. Obsolete. attire or dress.

adjective

  1. weary; fatigued
  2. (foll by of)
    1. having lost interest in; boredI’m tired of playing cards
    2. having lost patience with; exasperated byI’m tired of his eternal excuses
  3. hackneyed; stalethe same tired old jokes
  4. tired and emotional euphemistic slightly drunk

verb

  1. (tr) to reduce the energy of, esp by exertion; weary
  2. (tr; often passive) to reduce the tolerance of; bore or irritateI’m tired of the children’s chatter
  3. (intr) to become wearied or bored; flag

noun, verb

  1. the US spelling of tyre

verb, noun

  1. an archaic word for attire

adj.“exhausted, fatigued, weary,” early 15c., past participle adjective from tire (v.). v.“to weary,” also “to become weary,” Old English teorian (Kentish tiorian), of unknown origin, not found outside English. Related: Tired; tiring. n.late 15c., “iron rim of a carriage wheel,” probably from tire “equipment, dress, covering” (c.1300), a shortened form of attire. The notion is of the tire as the dressing of the wheel. The original spelling was tyre, which had shifted to tire in 17c.-18c., but since early 19c. tyre has been revived in Great Britain and become standard there. Rubber ones, for bicycles (later automobiles) are from 1870s. In addition to the idiom beginning with tired

  • tired out
  • also see:

  • dead on one’s feet (tired)
  • sick and tired
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