passim









passim


adverb Latin.

  1. here and there: used in bibliographic references to indicate that the writer has drawn upon material scattered throughout the source cited.

adverb Latin.

  1. so throughout: used especially as a footnote to indicate that a word, phrase, or idea recurs throughout the book being cited.

adverb

  1. here and there; throughout: used to indicate that what is referred to occurs frequently in the work cited

  1. a phrase used in printed works to indicate that a word, spelling, etc, occurs in the same form throughout

adv.“occurring in various places,” Latin, literally “scatteredly, in every direction,” adverb from passus, past participle of pandere “to stretch” (see pace (n.)). A word used in footnotes and similar material to indicate that a word or subject occurs frequently. For example, an entry in an index reading “coal: 78–86 passim” means that coal is mentioned throughout pages 78 to 86. Passim is Latin for “throughout” or “here and there.”

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